Ride the historic 1909 carousel in Riverfront Park. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the carousel is one of the most beautiful and well-preserved hand-made wooden carousels in the United States.

See the city’s motley monuments in and out of Riverfront Park, such as a statue of a local astronaut who died in the shuttle Columbia, a giant Japanese lantern, a trash goat, and the spiraling poem “Where the Ghosts of Salmon Jump.”

Take a cable car ride over the Spokane Falls.

Take a picture of the clock tower with the amber dial illuminated in the dark.

The trash goat is a sheet metal sculpture, and a vacuum reigns inside the goat. Therefore, if you bring small pieces of garbage to his mouth, the goat will “eat” them, making chewing sounds for greater naturalness.

Brown’s Addiction – National Historic District west of the city, where the first prestigious city blocks began to be built. It was home to the urban elite, and you can still see many old mansions built in the style of Queen Anne. There is also the Coeur d’Alene Park and the Museum of Art and Culture. One of the buildings of the museum is the Campbell House, built at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries for a local tycoon: a beautiful Tudor Renaissance mansion with original decor and one of the must-see city attractions. But the museum itself is very worthy of attention: it is the largest cultural organization in the northeast with underground galleries and a training center. His exhibitions focus on three themes: American Indians and other cultures, local history, and visual arts. For more information on Spokane painters, visit the Museum of Art and Culture.

Another famous building in Brown’s Addiction is the Patsy Clark Mansion, designed in 1897 for another millionaire. It can be found on West Second Avenue. For a long time, a restaurant operated in a mansion with a complex architecture, a remarkable main entrance, and a corner turret with a colonnade on top, and to this day, weddings and parties are held here.

The Green West Side of South Hill is one of the oldest residential areas in the city. When viewed from downtown, South Hill seems to be covered with evergreen trees, dominated by two tall buildings: the medical center and the beautiful Cathedral of St. John, an example of modern English Gothic architecture. The construction of the cathedral began on the site of the one that preceded it in 1925 and was completed in 4 years. The structure of the cathedral was made entirely of cut stone, and the building is decorated with stone carvings and stained glass windows in the classic Gothic style. Also noteworthy is the cathedral organ with more than 4 thousand pipes, made of such high quality that even the smallest pipes can be heard in every corner of the building. And on the tower of Bishop Cross, there is a 49-bell carillon, one of the few hand-made carillons in the northwest, cast in England. Listen to how he can be at Sunday service. In addition, every July, the city hosts a festival of carillonists with weekly concerts, which attracts masters from all over the world.

Spokane’s business hub is Riverside. Here you can find shops, hotels, and entertainment for all tastes. Like most cities built on the river, Spokane’s history is closely tied to it. Further downstream, there are Spokane waterfalls. There is also the popular Riverfront Park with many entertainment options for small and large, a convention center with an exhibition area, and a large shopping mall, River Park Square. In 1974, Riverfront Park hosted the World’s Fair, and all the pavilions have survived here to this day, as well as the famous clock tower with four dials.

The Monroe Street Bridge, recently refurbished, spans the Spokane Falls and is considered one of the city’s most recognizable symbols. This is an arched bridge, originally built in 1911 – at that time, it was the largest monolithic arched bridge in the country and the third-longest in the world.

Another characteristic building is the Old National Bank, which was erected in 1911 and became the first skyscraper in the northwest. This fifteen-story building, 66 meters high, became a symbol of the economic growth of the region, and its interior decoration was also very rich for that time. The grand duplex lobby has granite columns, and the second lobby has five elevators. In 1963, the building was refurbished with outstanding lighting that won a national award, and today the entire fa├žade is flooded with fluorescent light at night.

In particular, one of them is the 90-acre Manito Park, which opened in 1904. It houses the Duncan Gardens, a classic symmetrical garden in the European Renaissance style with a central fountain and an adjacent greenhouse with exotic plants.…